3 tools that can help you quit smoking

Whether you want to stop smoking for your health, your family, to save some money or to feel better about yourself, there are ways to make it happen – no matter how old you are, how much you smoke, or how many times you’ve tried to quit. Here are three tools you should know about that can help make quitting easier.

A game plan
If you think creating a step-by-step guide of what you will do to quit smoking, or a “quit plan,” is a pointless make-work project, think again. The act of putting a plan together is a proven factor in helping many of us stop smoking. It reminds you of your motivations, helps you learn from your past attempts, and helps you know how to overcome cravings before you’re in the middle of them.

Your plan should include the reasons you’re quitting, the things that trigger you to smoke and strategies you’ll use to deal with cravings. You can do this exercise on your own or use Health Canada’s online Quit Plan tool to build one in about 10 minutes.

Expert advice
It might surprise you to learn that in every province, territory and state in North America, there are trained quit coaches who give confidential one-on-one support to anyone interested in giving up cigarettes. These free services help in a variety of ways. They can walk you through support and treatment options to help you get through cravings, share self-help resources, talk you through slip ups, answer questions about ways to stay smoke-free, explain withdrawal symptoms and more.

An informed choice
Withdrawal from smoking generally starts within a day or two of your last cigarette, peaks in the first week and can last about two to four weeks. While withdrawal may be uncomfortable, there are quit tools that will help you deal with the symptoms of withdrawal such as nicotine replacement therapy, or NRT. There is also an array of other quit aids, some you likely have heard about, others maybe not.

Overall, the best thing you can do or use to quit smoking is, of course, the one that works for you. But exploring options to make the process easier and combining different tools and approaches can make a big difference.

Find more information about tools to quit at canada.ca/quit-smoking

Related Content

3 reasons to prioritize your mental health

3 reasons to prioritize your mental health

Everyone can experience challenges with their mental health at one time or another. Prioritizing your own mental health and well-being can bring many benefits. Here are a few to consider: Build resilience By supporting your mental health even when times are good –...

read more
RSV: A health risk for seniors too, not just kids

RSV: A health risk for seniors too, not just kids

Respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, is a highly contagious illness, with mild cases having similar symptoms to a cold or flu. Many people associate RSV with young children, however, RSV can affect people of all ages. In fact, adults over the age of 60 are among those...

read more
Demystifying dementia: 3 things you should know

Demystifying dementia: 3 things you should know

According to the latest national data from 2020-2021, almost 477,000 people aged 65 and older living in Canada have been diagnosed with dementia. The number is likely to be higher when accounting for people living with undiagnosed dementia. You have certainly heard...

read more
3 ways to support family and friends through a tough time

3 ways to support family and friends through a tough time

We all go through difficult moments in life. But if you notice that a friend or loved one seems consistently sad or unhappy, it could signal they are struggling with their mental health and need the support of others. Mental health challenges can become serious, or...

read more
RSV poses serious health risks for older Canadians

RSV poses serious health risks for older Canadians

Of all the things you can get sick with, respiratory syncytial virus – known as RSV – might not be top of mind. But it’s an important one to be aware of, especially for older adults. The common, highly contagious virus is sometimes perceived as a bug that children...

read more