4 ways students can reduce their risk of fraud

by | Jun 9, 2024 | Home and Living

Like all Canadians, post-secondary students are facing increasing fraud attempts. According to a recent survey from Royal Bank of Canada, almost half of students polled say they have been met with more fraud attempts since starting their post-secondary studies. Still, many students may not be doing enough to keep their money and information safe. Almost 60 per cent of post-secondary students admit they are not as vigilant as they should be when it comes to reducing their risk of fraud.

“With new, sophisticated scams on the rise, and many students managing their finances for the first time, being aware of the risks, knowing how to spot scams and taking steps to protect personal and financial information are key,” says Kevin Purkiss, the bank’s vice president of fraud management.

Purkiss offers four steps students, and all Canadians, can take to reduce their risk of fraud and stay ahead of scammers.

  • Think twice about who you trust: Got a message out of the blue asking for your information or money? Do your research and give the company a call through their official number. Remember fraudsters often impersonate government officials, bank staff, law enforcement, retailers and other brands to gain your trust.
  • Protect yourself: Turn on banking alerts, monitor account activity and check your bank and credit card statements regularly. Use multi-factor authentication whenever possible. Change your passwords regularly, making them tough to guess, and use different passwords for different sites. Consider using a passphrase which consists of a sequence of different words.
  • Stay safe online: Never enter login information or credit card details unless you’re sure a website is legitimate. Red flags include spelling errors, a URL that doesn’t match the company’s verified site or no security lock symbol in the address bar.
  • Pause before sharing…or acting: Never share your debit card, credit card or banking passwords, and limit sharing personal information on social media. Avoid clicking on links or opening attachments from unknown senders. Watch for anything asking you to respond immediately. If an offer is too good to be true, it usually is.

Learn more at rbc.com/cyber

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