Sneaky ways to add protein to your diet

by | Aug 1, 2023 | Food and Recipes

Found in staples like meat, eggs and legumes such as beans and lentils, protein helps build and repair muscle and tissue. The amount of protein you need varies from person to person, but the Canada Food Guide recommends that it makes up about one quarter of every meal and snack.

Here’s how to get protein into every meal of the day – without relying on meat.

  1. Go Greek
    Thick and creamy Greek (or Balkan or Scandinavian style) yogurt typically has more protein than the average tub of traditional yogurt. It’s a great way to pack some staying power into breakfast. And there are plenty of vegan varieties if you’re dairy-free or lactose intolerant. Just avoid super-high fat content or extra sugar and additives whatever you choose. Top it with fresh fruit and granola or museli cereal for a complete meal, or use it in potato salads, dips and baked goods instead of mayo or oil to sneak in extra protein and reduce fat without losing out on taste or texture.
  2. Roast chickpeas
    Stick a sheet pan of drained and rinsed chickpeas in the oven at 425 degrees F (220 degrees C) for about 40 minutes. Give them a stir about halfway through and you’ll find they come out deliciously crispy. Use them to make summer salads a little more filling or snack on them by the handful. They are a naturally protein- and fibre-rich way to stop hunger pangs from striking. Before roasting, coat them in a teaspoon of oil and your favourite spices and herbs – maybe paprika and garlic salt or simply salt and pepper – so they pack a punch of satisfying flavour too.
  3. Level up your bread
    Adding peanut butter, cream cheese or a sliced egg to your toast is classic. But if you prefer plain buttered toast for breakfast, or want a meat-free way to add oomph to sandwiches, sprouted-grain bread can be a great way to pack in natural protein without nut butter, dairy or eggs. Silver Hills Bakery’s Big 16 sprouted-grain bread, for example, has a whopping 12 grams of plant-based protein to help keep your energy and focus steady throughout the day. Sprouting the grains makes more fibre and vitamins easily available to your body.

Find out more at silverhillsbakery.ca

Related Content

Rules for importing food to Canada

Rules for importing food to Canada

More food than ever before is being traded across borders. Many of the foods we eat and ingredients we use are imported – from spices, nuts and snack foods to coffee, tea and other beverages. While all this can bring adventure to our taste buds, more trade can add...

read more
Sustainable innovation extends local strawberry season

Sustainable innovation extends local strawberry season

The beginning of strawberry season is one of the most anticipated times of the year for local food lovers in Ontario. It used to be a crop limited to spring and early summer – but thanks to modern technology and sustainable production practices, we can enjoy the...

read more
Local asparagus provides the first fresh taste of spring

Local asparagus provides the first fresh taste of spring

After a long, cold winter, many of us look forward to spring with anticipation – including that first taste of fresh, local fruits and veggies. Typically, asparagus is the first to appear in Ontario grocery stores, markets and restaurants every year, in season from...

read more
Celebrating cultural traditions through food

Celebrating cultural traditions through food

In Canada, our rich background of various cultures creates a vibrant culinary landscape that extends beyond borders. From aromatic spices to exotic flavours, the love for ethnic and imported foods has woven its way into the hearts – and stomachs – of many Canadians....

read more
Growing our summer fruit favourites – sustainably

Growing our summer fruit favourites – sustainably

As summer approaches, we look forward to enjoying favourite fruits like peaches, nectarines, cherries, apricots and plums. Farmers in southern Ontario, where many of these fruits are grown in Canada, have been adapting their orchards to respond to the changing climate...

read more
Healthy eating for a healthy smile

Healthy eating for a healthy smile

Food and beverage choices have an impact on a person’s oral and overall health. We know that a sugar-rich diet increases health risks like type 2 diabetes and heart disease, but did you know that foods high in sugar or acid can also lead to a weakening of tooth enamel...

read more